Together Towards and Beyond Smart Grids IEEE

Programme

Tutorials on Sunday 18th June at PowerTech 2017 include (codes according to the Full Programme):

Tutorial 1: The Smart Transformer: Impact on the Electric Grid and Technology Challenges Top

Sunday, 18th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Marco Liserre, Kiel University, Germany

Speaker(s): Marco Liserre, Kiel University, Germany; Costas Vournas, National Technical University of Athens, Greece; Giampaolo Buticchi, Kiel University, Germany; Giovanni De Carne, Kiel University, Germany

Abstract

The increasing connection of renewables and new loads is challenging the distribution grids. In the ERC Consolidator Grant “Highly Efficient And Reliable smart Transformer – HEART”, a new concept of transformer is proposed: the “Smart Transformer”. The Smart Transformer is a power electronics-based transformer, aims not only to adapt the voltage level from MV to LV grids but also to provide ancillary services to the grid.

The Smart Transformer can control the reactive power in MV grid sustain the voltage profile, and it can interact with loads and generators in the LV grid by means of voltage and frequency control. Moreover, the Smart Transformer is a natural connection point for hybrid (AC and DC) grids both at MV and LV levels.

This tutorial aims to introduce the Smart Transformer concept, topologies and basic controller at first, and to explore the advanced features that the Smart Transformer offers. The tutorial focuses on the ancillary services offered in LV and MV grids by the Smart Transformer, with particular focus on voltage and frequency control of LV grids, load sensitivity identification and load control, and reactive power support in MV grids.
The tutorial will be composed of theoretical lectures (50%), practical examples (25%) and on-site simulations using PSCAD (25%).

Structure

This full day tutorial will consist of the following four blocks of 1.5 hour duration each.

  1. Smart Transformer definition, control and architectures.
  2. Control of the Smart Transformer.
  3. Load sensitivity identification and voltage/frequency control of LV Grid.
  4. ST ancillary services for MV and HV grids.

Tutorial 2: Power Quality – Academic Research with Practical Applications Top

Sunday, 18th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Sarah Rönnberg, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden

Speaker(s): Sarah Rönnberg, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden; Math Bollen, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden

Abstract

Power quality as a modern research subject appeared somewhere around 1990 and it has from the beginning been very much driven by practical developments. The final aim of all work (research as well as practical) on power quality is to avoid interference between the grid and equipment connected to it. Changes in the power system (from LED lamps through large wind parks) make their impact often felt through deterioration of the power quality. This tutorial will give an overview of power quality, with reference to the different developments that impact the probability of interference. More detailed presentations will be given on three specific types of disturbances: voltage dips (short duration reductions in voltage magnitude); harmonics (stationary distortion in the voltage or current waveform at frequencies below 2 kHz); and supraharmonics (stationary distortion at frequencies between 2 kHz and 150 kHz). The latter subject has appeared less than 10 years ago as a separate research area and the interest for the subject is growing very quickly. For each of these types of disturbances, both research activities and practical applications will be discussed. An important role of academic work on power quality, and of this tutorial, is to create bridges between academic research and practical applications. This tutorial will be given by world-leading researchers on voltage dips and supraharmonics.

Structure

This full day tutorial will consist of the following four blocks of 1.5 hour duration each.

  1. Overview of power quality; different power quality disturbances; impact of different changes on the power quality.
  2. Harmonics and interharmonics.
  3. Supraharmonics (2 to 150 kHz).
  4. Voltage dips.

Tutorial 3: Voltage Fluctuations and Light Flicker in Modern Electrical Power Systems Top

Sunday, 18th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Roberto Langella, Università degli Studi della Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Italy

Speaker(s): Alfredo Testa, Università degli Studi della Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Italy; Roberto Langella, Università degli Studi della Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Italy; Jiri Drapela, Brno University of Technologies, Czech Republic

Abstract

Voltage fluctuations (VF) can be described as repetitive or random variations of the voltage envelope due to sudden changes in the real and reactive power drawn by a load; their characteristics depend on the load type and size and the power system capacity.
The aim of the tutorial is to give basic concepts to understand causes and effects of VF with particular attention to their main effect that is Light Flicker (LF). LF is produced by the fluctuations on the luminous flux emitted by the lamps when fed by a fluctuating voltage. For historical reasons, the instrument aimed to measure LF, known as Flickermeter, was designed in the early seventies starting from epidemiological studies conducted using incandescent lamps. Today, the scenario is totally different, in fact in some countries incandescent lamps are only a small fraction among the different other technologies (CFLs, LED, …) and are destined to be banned in the future.

The tutorial is organized as follows. Firstly, basic definitions on VF will be given and a quick overview on their causes and effects will be done. Afterwards, effects different from LF (e.g. transformers and AC motors reduction of useful life, excitation of turbo-generators shaft mechanical resonances, PLL inaccuracies, …) will be briefly recalled and analyzed. Then, after an initial recall on the LF phenomenon produced by incandescent lamps, the effects of VF on lamps different from incandescent will be described analytically and experimentally; successively, a generalized lamp model proposed by the speakers will be described. Finally, a brief overview on the historical development of IEC flickermeter will be done explaining its implementation and its limitations in terms of assessment of LF for lamps different from incandescents concluding with the description of new proposals of flickermeters discussed in the scientific community.

Structure

This full day tutorial will consist of the following four blocks of 1.5 hour duration each.

  1. Voltage fluctuations: definitions, causes and effects. In this block basic definitions on voltage fluctuations will be given and a quick overview on their causes and effects will be done.
  2. Effects different from Light Flicker. In this block the effects different from light flicker (e.g. transformers and AC motor reduction of useful life, turbo generators shaft mechanical resonance, PLL and PQ instruments inaccuracies, …) will be briefly recalled and analyzed.
  3. Light Flicker effects produced by voltage fluctuations on different Lamp technologies. In this block after an initial recall on the Light Flicker phenomenon produced by incandescent lamps, the effects of voltage fluctuations on lamps different from incandescent will be described analytically and experimentally; successively, a generalized lamp model proposed by the authors will be described.
  4. Toward New Flickermeters able to take into account lamps different from incandescent. In this block a brief overview on the historical development of IEC flickermeter will be done explaining its implementation and its limitations in terms of assessment of LF for lamps different from incandescent. Finally, new proposals of flickermeters (Light FM and Simulation based FMs) discussed in the scientific community will be described.

Tutorial 4: Multi-Energy Systems Modelling: A Comprehensive Introduction Top

Sunday, 18th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Pierluigi Mancarella, The University of Manchester, UK and The University of Melbourne, Australia

Speaker(s): Pierluigi Mancarella, The University of Manchester, UK and The University of Melbourne, Australia; Eduardo Martinez-Cesena, The University of Manchester, UK; Stephen Clegg, The University of Manchester, UK; Nicholas Good, The University of Manchester, UK

Abstract

The aim of this tutorial is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the modelling of Multi-Energy Systems (MES) that envisage the integration of multiple energy vectors and systems (e.g., electricity, heat, cooling, gas, transport, water, etc.) from technical, environmental and socio-economic perspectives. The material presented will be based on the speakers’ research activities over the last ten years within the context of several UK, European and international projects.

The topics that will be covered include:

  • Background: motivation for and definition of MES;
  • Multi-energy load and generation modelling;
  • Building and home energy management systems;
  • Integrated multi-vector load flow analysis;
  • Integrated optimal power flow in MES;
  • Optimal energy management of district energy systems;
  • Planning under uncertainty of district energy systems;
  • Flexibility, demand response and virtual energy storage in MES;
  • Ancillary services provision from distributed MES;
  • Business cases for smart communities, multi-energy microgrids, and distributed MES;
  • Integrated electricity-heat-gas transmission system operation modelling (steady-state and transient analysis);
  • System level modelling and assessment of power-to-X options (power-to-hydrogen; power-to-gas; power-to-heat; etc.);
  • Challenges ahead in MES modelling.
  • Specific case study examples, a list of key publications, and recently developed modelling tools will also be presented and illustrated.

Structure

This full day tutorial will consist of four blocks of 1.5 hour duration each.