Together Towards and Beyond Smart Grids IEEE

Programme

Special Sessions at PowerTech 2017 include (codes according to the Full Programme):

Monday, 19th June

Tuesday, 20th June

Wednesday, 21st June

Thursday, 22nd June

SS01: ADVANTAGE: Advanced Communication and Information Processing in Smart GridsTop

Monday, 19th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Aristides Kiprakis, University of Edinburgh, UK; Pedro Cruz, University of Sevilla, Spain

Abstract

This EU ITN Marie Curie project is a major inter-disciplinary and inter-sectoral 4 year research effort between power and communications engineering research and development communities, training 13 Early Stage Researchers (ESR). In this session, 5 ESRs will present the current status of their research and the expected outcomes.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “State Estimation in Electric Power Systems Using Belief Propagation” by Mirsad Cosovic, Schneider Electric, UK
  2. “Non-Technical Losses Detection in Power Systems using Smart Meters Data” by Madalina Buzau, University of Sevilla, Spain
  3. “Consumer: The Emerging Actor in Grid Balancing” by Gautham Krishnadas, Flexitricity, UK
  4. “Model predictive control for efficient building heating in the smart-grid” by Pierre Vogler-Finck, Neogrid, Denmark
  5. “Four-wire microgrid systems” by Rubén R. Lliuyacc, University of Seville, Spain

SS02: MIGRATE – Massive InteGRATion of power Electronic Devices Top

Monday, 19th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Andreas Menze, TenneT, Germany; Hannes Munzel, TenneT, Germany

Abstract

By 2020, several areas of the HVAC pan-European transmission system will be operated with extremely high penetrations of Power Electronics(PE)-interfaced generators, thus becoming the only generating units for some periods of the day or of the year – due to renewable (wind, solar) electricity. This will result in i) growing dynamic stability issues for the power system (possibly a new major barrier against future renewable penetration), ii) the necessity to upgrade existing protection schemes and iii) measures to mitigate the resulting degradation of power quality due to harmonics propagation. European TSOs from Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain and UK have joined to address such challenges with manufacturers (GE, Schneider Electric) and universities/research centres. They propose innovative solutions to progressively adjust the HVAC system operations. Firstly, a replicable methodology is developed for appraising the distance of any EU 28 control zone to instability due to PE proliferation and for monitoring it in real time, along with a portfolio of incremental improvements of existing technologies (the tuning of controllers, a pilot test of wide-area control techniques and the upgrading of protection devices with impacts on the present grid codes). Next, innovative power system control laws are designed to cope with the lack of synchronous machines. Numerical simulations and laboratory tests deliver promising control solutions together with recommendations for new PE grid connection rules and the development of a novel protection technology and mitigation of the foreseen power quality disturbances. Technology and economic impacts of such innovations are quantified together with barriers to be overcome in order to recommend future deployment scenarios. Dissemination activities support the deployment schemes of the project outputs based on knowledge sharing among targeted stakeholders at EC level.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “Power stability issues under high penetration of PE” by Sven Rüberg, TenneT, Germany
  2. “Real time monitoring and control” by James Yu, Scottish Power Energy Networks, UK
  3. “Control of a grid with 100% converter based devices” by Marie-Sophie Debry, RTE, France
  4. “Protection schemes in transmission networks with high PE penetration” by David López Corton, Red Eléctrica de España, Spain
  5. “Power quality in transmission networks with high PE penetration” by Jaka Zvab, ELES, Slovenia

SS03: Ancillary services from distribution networks: the view of the project SmartNet Top

Monday, 19th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Gianluigi Migliavacca, RSE SpA, Italy

Abstract

The three-years long project SmartNet aims at comparing possible architectures for optimized interaction between TSOs and DSOs, including exchange of information for monitoring and for acquisition of ancillary services (reserve and balancing, voltage regulation, congestion management), both for local needs and for the entire power system. Different coordination schemes for the interaction between TSO and DSO are compared on the basis of three national cases (Denmark, Italy, Spain) in order to analyse the impact of DERs’ operation on the dispatching, market layout and sequencing, signals exchanged between TSO and DSO, ICT requirements and regulatory implications. The objective is to develop an ad hoc simulation platform which models all three layers, i.e. physical network, market and ICT, in order to analyse three national cases (Italy, Denmark, Spain). Subsequently this simulation platform will be scaled to a full replica lab, where the performance of real controller devices is tested.

In addition, SmartNet includes three physical pilots testing specific technological solutions:

  • technical feasibility of key communication processes (monitoring of generators in distribution networks while enabling them to participate to frequency and voltage regulation),
  • capability of flexible demand to provide ancillary services for the system (thermal inertia of indoor swimming pools, distributed storage of base stations for telecommunication).

Finally, policy provisions necessary to enable needed TSO-DSO interaction are assessed and compared with present national and European regulation.

The present session aims at collecting the main findings of the project at half way of its activities and promoting a debate on the issue of TSO-DSO interaction, that is now one of the key discussion topics at European level.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “TSO-DSO coordination schemes for accommodating ancillary services from distribution networks” by Daan Six, VITO, Belgium
  2. “Advanced market schemes for allowing ancillary services from distribution networks” by Guillaume Leclercq, N-SIDE, Belgium
  3. “Communication and ICT requirements for allowing system services from distribution grids” by Seppo Horsmanheimo, VTT, Finland
  4. “A new platform for testing TSO-DSO coordination schemes” by Marco Rossi, RSE, Italy
  5. “Presentation of the three technological pilots” by Carlos Madina, TECNALIA, Spain
  6. “Regulatory, planning and operation implications of TSO-DSO coordination for ancillary services from distribution grids” by Ivana Kockar, University of Strathclyde, UK

SS04: Multi-lab Interconnections for Large-Scale Simulation and Hardware-in-the-Loop Top

Monday, 19th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Bryan Palmintier, NREL, USA; Antonello Monti, University of Aachen, Germany

Abstract

Lab testing that couples power system simulation with actual hardware enables experimenting with equipment-grid-ICT interactions, including adverse conditions, without interfering with customers or critical infrastructure. As a result, numerous labs exist world-wide with related, but distinct capabilities. However, to test emerging grid challenges and technologies, it becomes increasingly important to link multiple facilities to conduct large-scale integrated experiments that can both utilize unique capabilities and equipment, and emulate large-scale interconnected grids. This panel will explore past and on-going efforts in this space, and also highlight a related key outcome of these links: stronger collaboration and knowledge sharing between participants.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “International Lab-Lab Links with RWTH Aachen University” by Antonello Monti, University of Aachen, Germany
  2. “International and inter-state lab links for Smart-Grid Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulations at NREL” by Bryan Palmintier, NREL, USA
  3. “The important role of research infrastructures in context of smart grid technology development, validation, and roll-out” by Thomas Straßer and Georg Lauss, AIT, Austria
  4. “Using the experimental facility SYSLAB for investigations of control and operation of integrated energy systems in HIL and multi-site configurations” by Henrik W. Bindner, DTU, Denmark
  5. “Real-time Inter-lab links for high performance integration” by Rob Hovsapian, INL, USA

SS05: Disaster management and resilience in electric power systems Top

Tuesday, 20th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Pierluigi Mancarella, The University of Manchester, UK, and The University of Melbourne, Australia; Rodrigo Moreno, Universidad de Chile, Chile, and Imperial College London, UK

Abstract

Historically, network reliability practices and security standards have considered the occurrence of the so-called credible outages and ignore those rare, originated by low probability but high impact events associated with natural hazards. This panel will present several efforts around the world by both academia and industry that address the occurrence of catastrophic events and their impacts on power networks, attempting to recommend changes in the operational and planning practices to manage and build more resilient electricity grids in the future. Importantly, panelists will show the use of advanced simulation and optimization tools to quantify risks associated with high impact low probability events and recommend both mitigation and adaptation measures to deal with an array of natural hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, flooding, storms, etc. There will be also practical presentations based on lessons learnt from actual experiences in countries such as Chile (regarding earthquakes and tsunamis) and UK (regarding extreme weather). This panel session will also present the outputs of the joint UK-Chile project funded by EPSRC and Conicyt under the Newton Fund arrangement.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “Operational and infrastructure multi-phase modelling and metrics to assess power systems resilience to natural hazards” by Mathaios Panteli, The University of Manchester, UK
  2. “Lessons from the 2010 Chilean earthquake and its impact on electricity supply” by Hugh Rudnick, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile
  3. “Review of network security standards in the UK: Security vs Resiliency” by Goran Strbac, Imperial College London, UK
  4. “Controlled islanding, microgrids, and smart grid measures to improve resilience” by Nikos Hatziargyriou, NTUA, Athens
  5. “Improving power system resiliency through optimization via simulation” by Alejandro Navarro Espinosa, Universidad de Chile, Chile”

SS06: Supraharmonics – waveform distortion in the range 2 kHz to 150 kHz Top

Tuesday, 20th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Math Bollen, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden

Abstract

There are numerous reasons for the shift from rather passive (diode- and thyristor-based) to more active (transistor-based) converters connected to the grid. Two important drivers are higher requirements on energy efficiency and strict harmonic limits. But the overall reduction in costs of power electronics and developments in automatic control are important enablers for this shift.

An adverse consequence of this is the introduction of new frequency components in the voltage and current being injected by these converters, mostly above 2 kHz. These are referred to, among other terms, as “supraharmonics”. Another source of supraharmonics is formed by power line communication, mainly with remotely-read energy meters, where the frequency range 9 to 95 kHz is allocated for use by network operators. It was mainly the use of this frequency band for communication with so-called “smart meters” that triggered standardization in the 2 to 150 kHz band. The standardization efforts are however hindered by a lack of knowledge on, among others, emission levels and propagation of disturbances.

Both the subject and the term “supraharmonics” have been subject to quite some controversy, where opinions range from “being extremely important” to “of no interest to anybody at all”. In this special session we will aim to put the subject into perspective and show that, although being an important subject for both industry and academia, there is no reason for panic concerning supraharmonics.

The presenters in this special session are three academics, which have all worked on putting the subject on the agenda, and two representatives from industry, which get in contact with disturbances in the range from 2 to 150 kHz on a regular basis. The presentations will all give different views on this interesting and still very much evolving subject.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “Measurements of supraharmonics” by Jan Meyer, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany
  2. “The role of resonances in the spread of supraharmonics” by Sarah Rönnberg, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden
  3. “Waveform distortion and efficiency of modern power electronic equipment” by Sasa Djokic, University of Edinburgh, UK
  4. “Measurement technology for high-frequency disturbances” by Robert Olofsson, Metrum Sweden AB, Sweden
  5. “High-frequency distortion in railway traction systems” by Stefan Niska, Swedish transport authority, Sweden

SS07: Current and Future Industry Needs and Trends Top

Tuesday, 20th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Luis (Nando) Ochoa, The University of Manchester, UK, and The University of Melbourne, Australia

Abstract

TBC

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “Title TBC” by Wanda Reder, S&C Electric, UK
  2. “Market Value Principles for Fast Frequency and Grid Stability Services in Low Inertia Grids” by Douglas Wilson, GE, USA
  3. “Applications of Real Time Simulation for Energy Systems” by Kati Sidwall, RTDS, Canada
  4. “Digital Transformation for Energy Transition” by Yannick Jacquemart, RTE, France
  5. “Electricity North West Future Challenges” by Geraldine Bryson, Electricity North West Limited, UK
  6. ComEd, USA

SS08: NOBEL GRID & WISEGRID projects – Clean energy for All Top

Tuesday, 20th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Lola Alacreu, ETRA I+D, Spain

Abstract

NOBEL GRID & WISEGRID H2020 projects, with a total budget of 30 M€ in the area of Smart Grids and Storage, will provide a set of solutions, technologies and business models to increase the smartness, stability and security of an open, consumer-centric European energy grid and provide cleaner and more affordable energy for European citizens, through an enhanced use of storage technologies and electro-mobility and a highly increased share of RES. These projects are providing applications for different actors, such as prosumers, DSOs, aggregators and EV fleet operators, and advanced smart metering solutions, in order to share the benefits of the European Smart Grid in a fair, sustainable and efficient way and achieve an all-win situation. In this context, the projects promote, by means of new technologies and business models, collective schemes and community initiatives, giving power and protection to the final consumer, a more competitive and well-functioning internal energy market, and help address serious social problems of vulnerable consumers and energy poverty.

Specifically, NOBEL GRID & WISEGRID H2020 projects focus on players such as electric cooperatives or public institutions –e.g. municipalities-, since it has been demonstrated that these organisations are the most effective to tackle the transition to energy democracy. Moreover, NOBEL GRID & WISEGRID H2020 projects are not just aiming at quantitative improvements brought by innovative technology, but to use technology innovation to support a change of paradigm in the energy market, including energy accumulation systems and the integration of charging infrastructure to favour the large-scale deployment of electric vehicles.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “General Presentation of Nobel Grid and WiseGRID projects” by Ana María Arias, ETRA I+D, Spain
  2. “Unbundled Smart Meter (USM) Concepts” by Mihai Sanduleac, EXENIR/CRE, Romania
  3. “Distribution Grid Management Tools in the Nobel Grid Project” by Aris Dimeas, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
  4. “Nobel Grid and WiseGRID Tools Demonstration in Real Environments” by Marco Paulucci, ASM Terni, Italy
  5. “Advanced energy management system based on the accumulation of energy” by Ander Muelas, AMPERE ENERGY, Spain

SS09: Grid Code Requirements and Renewable Sources Integration Top

Tuesday, 20th June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Stanko Janković, GOPA, Germany

Abstract

Grid Code is a document which defines technical requirements for maintaining stable and secure operation of the power system in real time and in the future for each country.. There are many national power system operators or associations of power system operators (for example European Network of Transmission System Operators for Electricity (abbreviation ENTSO-E), East African Power Pool etc.) in the world that have already issued Grid Codes, while in another country we are still waiting for this document to be written. In most cases Grid Code is one single document, but sometimes it consists of several linked documents usually named Annexes. Technical requirements for connection and operation of renewable sources are either integrated in a Grid Code, or they are written in a separated document. The main intention of this special session is to provide an overview of Grid Codes inside and outside Europe; to point out similarity and differences; to emphasize some unclear technical requirements which can be interpreted in different ways. Emphasis is on renewable sources integration and the special session includes presentations and share of experience from TSO and DSO representatives, consultant who was involved in the process of writing Grid Code and manufactory representatives with their share of interest in producing equipment which can meet the needs defined through Grid Code requirements.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “Overview of Grid Codes and Renewable Sources integration outside ENTSO-E” by Stanko Janković, GOPA, Germany
  2. “Overview of Grid Codes and Renewable Sources integration inside ENTSO-E” by Bojana Mihić, Elektromreža Srbije, Serbia
  3. “HVDC technical requirements in Grid Codes” by Ziming Song, Toshiba-Global, UK
  4. “RES integration in Germany as a challenge for the distribution system operator” by Remigiusz Pluciennik, E.DIS AG, Germany
  5. “Electrical Equipment Modeling under Grid Code Constraints” by Stefan Sterpu, EDF – R&D, France

SS10: Application of Grid Scale Energy Storage – Stability and Operation Top

Wednesday, 21st June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): (Peter) Pingliang Zeng, CEPRI, China

Abstract

It is well recognised that variability, uncertainty and limited inertia capability of renewable energy resources (RES) increase system operation cost and may present a barrier for achieving high penetration levels of renewable energy. In this context, grid scale energy storage (ES) can potentially play an important role in supporting cost effective integration of RES, improving electronified power system.

This organized session will focus on aspects of modelling and control of grid scale energy storage systems, especially in the context of improving system stability, voltage and frequency control and integration of renewable power.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “Feasible region method based integrated heat and electricity dispatch considering building thermal storage” by Hongbin Sun, Tsinghua University, China
  2. “Technologies and Applications of Energy Storages in Power Grids- Challenges and Experiences” by Liangzhong Yao, China Electric Power Research Institute, China
  3. “Virtual Energy Storage System for Power System Frequency Response” by Jianzhong Wu, Cardiff University, UK
  4. “Role of energy storage in supporting cost effective integration of renewable generation” by Goran Strbac, Imperial College London, UK
  5. “Storage contribution to frequency response of reduced inertia systems” by Atia Adrees, The University of Manchester, UK
  6. “Optimal Allocation of Energy Storage System for Fluctuation Mitigation in Active Distribution System” by Souxiang Wang, Tianjin University, China

SS11: Grid Responsive Society Through Building Automation Systems – GReSBAS Top

Wednesday, 21st June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Aydogan Ozdemir, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey

Abstract

This special session is related with an ongoing ERA-Net Smart Grids Plus Project, GReSBAS. Within the smart grid context, Demand Response (DR) is identified as the inevitable solution to enhance the economic effectiveness of electricity markets, increase the integration of RES and improve the reliability and flexibility of electric power systems. There are several studies focused on technological and economic issues of smal-scale consumer engagement in DR programs. However, utilities still need to increase their awareness and interest in DR participation.

In this context, the GReSBAS project aims to enable the active participation of buildings in DR programs through gamified competition between building owners using building automation technologies. It will focus on coordinated demand side resources management, without affecting consumer comfort, through locally automated control actions, making it possible for utilities to measure the performance of participators and reward them, providing a socialized framework.

The project aims at informing the society that customers can contribute to fulfil their own expectations. Moreover, they will realize that they are in fact one of the main control variables of the chain. Since distributed generation is recognized as a sustainable solution leading to a major revolution of the energy market, small-scale consumers will strengthen this generation by actively participating in the process. On the other hand, competition has been one of the important tools to attain several key goals in the society. The project brings an active competition of the consumers between themselves for a more efficient usage of electricity.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “Future of Demand Response and Expected Changes in Country Regulations” by Mustafa Bagriyanik, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey
  2. “Advanced Models and Algorithms for Demand Participation in Electricity Markets” by Filipe Joel Soares, INESC, Portugal
  3. “Building Automation Solutions for Smart Grid Applications and Possible Improvements” by Unal Kucuk, MAKEL, Turkey
  4. “Optimal Supply and Demand Bidding Strategy for Aggregators of Small Prosumers” by José Iria, INESC, Portugal
  5. “National End-User Awareness Analysis on Demand Response and Gamification” by M. Alparslan Zehir, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey

SS12: The GARPUR probabilistic reliability management approach & criteria Top

Wednesday, 21st June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Efthymios Karangelos, University of Liege, Belgium

Abstract

As the pan-European electric power system is facing growing uncertainties (e.g., due to renewable generation, the ageing of system components, the climate change, etc.) and technical advancements (e.g., demand response, energy storage, high performance computing, big data, etc.) the migration from the deterministic “N-1” criterion to probabilistic reliability criteria is an emerging requirement as well as oppoortunity to maintain the system performance at a desirable level, while minimizing socio-economic costs.

The GARPUR (“Generally Accepted Reliability Principle with Uncertainty modelling and through probabilistic Risk assessment”) project aims to design, develop and evaluate such new reliability criteria to be progressively implemented over the next decades at a pan-European level, while maximizing social welfare. A particular innovation of GARPUR is a comprehensive application of the same probabilistic approach within the TSO different activities & timescales: system development, asset management and power system operation.

This session brings together leading contributors to the GARPUR project from the industry and academia to present and discuss the key project outcomes, particularly:

  • the GARPUR probabilistic reliability management approach and criterion (RMAC);
  • the pathways for the progressive implementation of the GARPUR RMAC across the TSO practices ranging from system development, through asset management to operational planning & operation;
  • the pilot tests for the validation of the GARPUR RMAC on realistic power systems and in near real-life conditions.

The GARPUR project is performed by collaborative efforts of 7 TSOs (Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Iceland and Norway), 12 R&D providers and 1 innovation management expert, and co-funded by the European Commission (7th Framework Programme). The overall project costs are estimated to 10.9M€, with the corresponding requested contribution from the European Commission of 7.8M€. GARPUR started September 1st 2013 and will run for 4 years until August 31st 2017.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “The GARPUR probabilistic reliability management approach and criteria (RMAC)” by Louis Wehenkel, University of Liege, Belgium
  2. “Pathways for the progressive implementation of the GARPUR reliability management approach and criteria (RMAC) in the context of system development” by Jonathan Sprooten, ELIA, Belgium
  3. “Pathways for the progressive implementation of the GARPUR reliability management approach and criteria (RMAC) in the context of asset management” by Remy Clement, RTe, France
  4. “Pathways for the progressive implementation of the GARPUR reliability management approach and criteria (RMAC) in the context of system operation” by Iris Baldursdottir, LANDSNET, Iceland
  5. “Pilot testing & validation of the GARPUR reliability management approach and criteria (RMAC) in near real-life conditions” by Simon Weizenegger, STATNETT SF, Oslo, Norway

SS13: Integrated Transmission-Distribution Analysis Top

Wednesday, 21st June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Bryan Palmintier, NREL, USA; Peter Palensky, TU-Delft, Netherlands

Abstract

The increasing adoption of distributed energy resources (DERs) requires unprecedented understanding of interactions and links across the historic transmission-distribution divide. This session will explore recent and on-going efforts, techniques, and results for integrated transmission-distribution analysis.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “Mathematical modeling of converter interfaced generation and load for robust positive sequence simulation” by Deepak Ramasubramanian, Arizona State University, USA
  2. “Bulk Services from Distributed Energy Systems: Flexibility Modelling, System-Level Benefits, and Business Case Assessment” by Pierluigi Mancarella, The University of Melbourne, Australia and The University of Manchester, UK
  3. “Integrated Transmission-Distribution-Communication-Market simulation for Grid Modernization” by Bryan Palmintier, NREL, USA
  4. “Transmission-Distribution Interactions in the SmartNet Project” by Julien Le Baut, AIT, Austria
  5. “Synchronization of multiple dynamic power system simulators for Transmission-Distribution system co-simulation” by Claudio López, TU-Delft, Netherlands

SS14: Mathematical foundations of power system analysis Top

Wednesday, 21st June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Chris Dent, University of Edinburgh, UK; Janusz Bialek, Skoltech Center for Energy Systems, Russia

Abstract

Both simulation and mathematical analysis draw conclusions based on a mathematical representation of a power system, however analysis focuses on inferring structural properties through derivation of rigorous mathematical results whereas simulation makes quantitative predictions for specific situations (with simulations usually modelling in greater detail). One of the most exciting developments in power systems analysis in the last ten years has been the revival of engagement by researchers from the optimisation and control communities in power systems research, along with continued advances by members of the existing power systems community with similar philosophies.

The session will begin with a historical overview and survey of the current situation in the power systems analysis community by Janusz Bialek, with illustrations from his own research experience. This will be followed by four further presentations from experts who work on the boundary between the power systems and optimisation/control communities, with emphasis on important recent developments in decentralised operation of power systems, on convexification of power flow optimisation problems to facilitate more efficient solution, and on graph theoretic approaches. In addition to presenting their own technical work, speakers will show how formal mathematical results have provided greater insight into and improved methods for solving practical engineering problems, and will suggest key areas for future research.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “A diatribe against simulation, or a personal view on the shape of power system research in the 21st Century” by Janusz Bialek, Skoltech Center for Energy Systems, Russia
  2. “Graph theory based analysis of power system stability” by David Hill, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  3. “Circuit theory based approaches for robust and unified analysis of electric power systems” by Gabriela Hug, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
  4. “High-performance Optimization Methods and Distributed Control Techniques for Power Systems: Theory, Algorithms, and Case Studies” by Javad Lavaei, University of California at Berkeley, USA
  5. “On the exact formulation and convexification of AC-OPF problems in radial power networks” by Jean-Yves Le Boudec and Mario Paolone, EPFL, Switzerland

SS15: Data Analytics Applications and Methods for Distribution Systems Top

Thursday, 22nd June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Reza Arghandeh, Florida State University, USA; Matthias Stifter, AIT, Austria

Abstract

This panel will address current research activities and development in the field of data-driven application for distribution systems. With the increase of measurement and sensor data, big data methods, like machine learning algorithms, parallel processing and real-time data stream processing, enable new insights for network planning and operation. System observability, state estimation, operational optimization, diagnosis, asset management, fault or intrusion detection, power quality monitoring are examples which will benefit from applying data analytical methods.

This session includes:
Cut through the hype – demystifying data and analytics for network companies by clearly defining the different ways data can be used and giving practical examples of how to get started based on those companies ahead in this space.
PMU and sensor based data-driven analytical methods for various applications like fault identification and topology detection are presented. Machine learning algorithms and methods used to identify particular pattern in faults and categorize them into several fault types.
Exploration on how machine learning can be used to extract value from this smart meter data to improve our lives, and also touches on the required technologies to process and store such volumes of data.
Data Analytic applications in power system industry include energy data service hubs, which in line with regulation in some European markets or an outage management tool that mines data across social media and diverse external information sources which is integrated with an Advanced Distribution Management System.
Examples from utility projects using parallel processing database environments for load modeling and characterizing for network applications, e.g. state estimation, event detection in load patterns as input to load forecasting and planning.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “Cutting through data driven hype and confusion” by Iain Stewart, Teradata, UK
  2. “Data-Driven Approaches for Event Detection in Power Distribution Networks” by Reza Arghandeh, Florida State University, USA
  3. “Non-intrusive Appliance Load Monitoring (NIALM) or energy disaggregation” by Oliver Parson, Centrica Connected Home, UK
  4. “Applications of data analytics in the power system industry” by Neil Walls, Omnetric, UK
  5. “Data-driven Methods for Distribution System Applications” by Matthias Stifter, AIT, Austria

SS16: Industry perspective on Synchrophasor technology Top

Thursday, 22nd June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Vedran Peric, TSCNET Services GmbH, Germany

Abstract

WAMS technology has been in focus of both practitioners and academics for more than two decades. Even though the technology is now widely accepted, it has been recognized that better cooperation between industry and academia is needed in order to facilitate efficient industry adaptation of the latest academic research results. This panel gathers mainly experts from the industry who will share their perspective on WAMS and present results of the their latest WAMS projects. In addition, the panel benefits from the university panellist who will present the results of the IDE4L FP7 project. The presented projects cover several important WAMS topics such as: 1) Integration of EMS and WAMS systems, 2) WAMS based implementation of a system integrity and protection schemes (WAMS SIPS), 3) Development of a flexible WAMS control platform, 4) Online monitoring of electromechanical oscillations, and 5) WAMS in Distribution systems.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “Integrating Wide-Area Monitoring and Energy Management System for Power System Operations” by Chris Halliday, SP Energy Network, UK
  2. “Utilising Wide Area Synchrophasor Measurements for Protection and Control of Electrical Grids” by Oleg Bageybter, GE Grid Solutions, UK
  3. “Synchrophasor Applications Facilitating Interactions in Transmission and Distribution Operations” by Luigi Vanfretti, KTH, Sweden
  4. “Distributed Wide Area Defense Principles and Implementation in the Icelandic Grid” by Douglas Wilson, Landsnet, Iceland
  5. “Operational Experiences of WAMS-based Damping Estimation Methods for Electromechanical Oscillations” by Janne Seppänen, Fingrid, Finland

SS17: Modelling and Dynamic Performance of Inverter based Generation in Power System Transmission and Distribution Studies Top

Thursday, 22nd June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Koji Yamashita, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan

Abstract

This is a joined working group of CIGRE and CIRED. The JWG was created in 2013 with over 60 international experts from more than 20 countries and is expected to be completed in 2017. According to the questionnaire survey which was conducted in the JWG, still 30% of the system operators do not use any Inverter-Based Generators (IBGs) models for the dynamic power system studies. One of the reasons is more likely to be lack of model requirements of IBG for specific power system phenomena. The JWG has made an effort to provide answers to the following questions (i) What are the missing characteristics of Inverter-Based Generators (IBGs) compared to traditional synchronous generators?, (ii) Which functionality of IBGs needs to be modeled for each type of dynamic study? (iii) How can the necessary functionalities of IBGs be modeled properly in EMT and RMS-type simulations? (iv) How can IBGs be aggregated in MV/LV network? and (v) How can we validate IBG models? focusing on the Photovoltaic Generation as the IBG. The major outcomes and key findings related to RMS models will be maximally highlighted during the limited time.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “Overview of CIGRE C4-C6.35/CIRED JWG” by Koji Yamashita, CRIEPI, UK
  2. “Characteristics of Inverter-Based Generator (IBG)” by Stanko Jankovic, GOPA, Germany
  3. “Necessary Functionalities for Key Phenomena related to Power System Stability” by Luis Pabon, Fraunhofer IWES, Germany
  4. “RMS Models” by Petros Aristidou, University of Leeds, UK
  5. “Model Validation” by Ziming Song, Toshiba-Global, Japan

SS18: Distributed Intelligence for local electricity market and secure grid operation Top

Thursday, 22nd June – Click here for time and room

Organiser(s): Madeleine Gibescu, TU Eindhoven, Netherlands; Phuong H. Nguyen, TU Eindhoven, Netherlands

Abstract

Massive integration of renewable energy resources and gradual growth of high electrical energy consuming appliances increase the uncertainties in today’s power systems in terms of network stability, reliability, security and efficiency, as well as system balancing. This transition introduces new challenges as well as opportunities for various parties that are involved in energy generation, transmission and distribution, such as the suppliers, aggregators, system operators, balance responsible parties and other actors in the energy supply chain. The concept of local energy markets is emerging as one of the main approaches to resolve operation limit violations of the network and to support system balancing in the future. Market-based mechanism that enables energy trading, while at the same time enhances the operation of the grid at the distribution level is therefore crucial for uncertainty reduction in smart energy system.

The field of local energy markets is a multidisciplinary area ranging from science, engineering and technology to policy, economics, regulation and human behaviour. Its research scope is hence covers a wide range of topics including the boundary of local energy markets and its trading mechanisms, as well as the development of smart methodologies for harvesting consumers’ for several purposes/applications such as balancing and congestion relief, over/under voltage and unbalance containment, grid losses minimization, component lifecycle extension and postponement of grid reinforcements or a combination of the above objectives.

This section will explore the benefits and limitation of local energy trading frameworks in collaboration between various parties involved in power system operation at the distribution level. This will be exchange platform among various on-going projects, both in the national, e.g. URSES project DISPATCH, and international level, e.g. ERA-NET SG+ project m2M-GRID, to enable a successful transition to a secure and reliable smart grid with large share of sustainable energy resources and to optimize the overall energy system efficiency.

Presentations and Speakers

  1. “Overview of the session” by Madeleine Gibescu, TU Eindhoven, Netherlands
  2. “Decentralized Energy Management in Future Smart Grids” by Johann Hurink, University Twente, Netherlands
  3. “Peer-to-peer concepts for control in and among microgrids” by Geert Deconinck, KU Leuven, Belgium
  4. “The H2020 EMPOWER project: Local Electricity Retail Markets for Prosumer Smart Grid Power Services – Technical Implementation and Business Models” by Bernt A. Bremdal, University of Tromso, Norway and Pol Olivella, CITCEA-UPC, Spain
  5. “From micro to Mega grid: Interactions of micro-grids in active distribution networks” by Phuong Nguyen, TU Eindhoven, Netherlands